Friday, November 09, 2007

Typology and my 'never gonna do it' phd.

I sometimes wonder that if I had the inclination/ discipline/ ability/ time to do a phd, I would do it on something to do with typology (here for some stuff on someone else's thought on typology).

I'd want to investigate the possibility that typology (as a view of history) is the fundamental presupposition/ basis for the way the different phases of the bible relate to one another, in particular for the relationship between the new and the old testaments. I'd probably want to investigate in particular my hunch that typology undergirds the ways the apostles and other NT authors interpreted the OT, and that all the different ways of describing how we 'get to Christ' from the OT are bound together by typology in some way.

I think some of the cash-value would be;
  • Rescuing apostolic exegesis from those who want to say we can't imitate their methods.
  • Opening up a greater appreciation for some patristic exegesis (and providing a proper framework for assessing when analogical stuff goes too far).
  • Moving towards developing a philosophy of history that is biblical and Christological.
  • Increasing people's appreciation (including my own) for Hebrew narrative (which, it strikes me, has a fair bit of typology in it).
  • Thinking through issues of referent and fulfilment(s) of prophecy in all the bible.
  • Opening up levels of typological allusion that will enrich the church's understanding of scripture and combat exegetical minimalism.
  • Moving towards providing a framework for a balanced assessment of maximalism and its proper bounds.
  • Give some tools for genuine word ministry among not-so-wordy cultures (I suspect typology, with its associational way of thinking has lots to help 'less booky' people)..
In other words, it would help me (and hopefully others among God's people) gain a better grasp of the richness of history, Christ, the old testament, prophecy, and teaching ministry.

12 comments:

Neil Jeffers said...

You've certainly got the discipline and ability. Inclination and time can always be worked on!
Go on!

Pete said...

I might do some work on this sort of subject in my first sabbatical.

Matt said...

mmm sabbatical

Pete said...

One every seven years mate, surely?

DavidF said...

please, please do a PhD on typology

Marc Lloyd said...

Not to mention the cash required for a PhD. But you can put me down for a copy of the book, if its not toooo expensive.

Samuel Lago said...

I find these points the most exciting:
" * Rescuing apostolic exegesis from those who want to say we can't imitate their methods.

* Opening up a greater appreciation for some patristic exegesis (and providing a proper framework for assessing when analogical stuff goes too far)."

I get the feeling that the "we can0t imitate the apostolic method" people, have an agenda: exegesis can only be done by the Apostels themselves, or those with apostolic authority, -i.e. "The Church", understood in institutional, hierarchical terms.

As for Patristic exegesis, while certainly at many points is flawed, seems to bring su closer to how to bring in tradition into theology, in partnership with exegesis. we should look towards reading Scripture with each other, in the present, and in the past, taking seriously and authoritatively (but not supremely) what has been said in the past, while recognising that the Spirit may bring us continually into a better understanding of what God has said in His Word.

Samuel Lago said...

p.s.- Apologies for the mutliple typos in the previous post.

Pete said...

Thanks Sam

Ι've honestly never reflected much on the agenda of those against copying apostolic exegesis. You seem to know more about this than I do. I guess I'd always assumed it was a mistaken commitment to grammatical historical methods as the be all and end all (rather than the necessary beginning) of exegesis, combined with a genuine puzzlement at some of the ways apostolic authors seem to be using the OT (Hosea 11 in Matthew 2 being the oft-quoted example).

Samuel Lago said...

I DON'T know! I said "I get the feeling". However, its something I've observed on the net (discussion forums and the like), not neccesarily something that actually goes on in academic circles (although I certainly could be wrong).

Samuel Lago said...

P.S.- One of your favorite movies is "Duck Soup"??! No way! Good taste!

Pete said...

Yeah. I like the Marx Brothers. Except Karl.